[REQ_ERR: 500] [KTrafficClient] Something is wrong. Enable debug mode to see the reason. High and low german dialects... German Dialects: The Sound of Plattdeutsch

German Dialects: Understanding the language of Everything.

German dialects are divided into two groups- High German and Low German. High German dialects are spoken in places like Bavaria and Austria while Low German are spoken in the eastern Netherlands and in northern Germany. Over 78 million people in Europe speak German as native language. How to Speack and Pronounce German Words. While pronouncing German words may be difficult at first, you’ll.

The main division in German dialects is between Low German and High German. The latter grouping of dialects underwent an additional sound change around AD 500 known as the Second or (High) German Consonant Shift that other West-Germanic dialects and languages (including Low German, Dutch, Afrikaans, Frisian and English) did not.

Low German, High German, Upper German- what is all that.

There are two principal divisions of the German language: High German, or Hochdeutsch, and Low German, or Plattdeutsch. One of the most striking differences between them is the result of a consonant shift (usually referred to as the second, or High German, sound shift) that took place before the 8th cent. A.D. in certain West Germanic dialects.ABOUT DIALECTS AND HIGH GERMAN. Although the German-speaking areas of Europe--counting only Germany in the borders of 1937 (470662 sq.km), Austria (83850 sq.km), Switzerland (all; 41293 sq.km), Liechtenstein (157 sq.km)--are but a fraction of the territory of the U.S. (9363353 sq.km), the linguistic diversity of the German language is immensely greater than the variants of American English.High German synonyms, High German pronunciation, High German translation, English dictionary definition of High German. n. 1. German as indigenously spoken and written in Austria, Switzerland, and central and southern Germany. 2. The standard variety of German used as the.


By the High German consonant shift, the map of German dialects is divided into Upper German (green) and Central German (blue), and Low German (yellow). The main isoglosses, the Benrath and Speyer lines are marked in black.The German language is divided into two mam dialect groups, Low German (Niederdeutsch or Plattdeutsch) and High German (Hochdeutsch). Geographically, High German is generally found in southern Germany where it is more mountainous (hence the term 'High' German), and Low German is found in the north where the landscape is flat or platt.

This is confusing in that “Low German” is also used to refer to the language group to which Low Saxon and Low Franconian varieties (thus also Dutch and Afrikaans) belong. Some people in Germany consider the Saxon-derived dialects used in the Netherlands a different language, justifying this with the argument that those dialects are Dutch-influenced while those east of the border are German.

Read More

The term “High German” does not imply any superiority to “Low German”—the only differences are geographic and linguistic. Plattdeutsch or Niederdeutsch come from the low lands. Ironically, in recent decades there has been a conscious effort to preserve local and regional dialects in the German-speaking world. Many news publications.

Read More

In the Middle Ages, Plattdeutsch, or Low German as it is called in English, was the predominant language in northern Germany and an important language for trade and commerce as the lingua franca of the Hanseatic League. But in the 16th century, High German began to take on more cultural significance as trade routes changed, shifting power to German states further south. Martin Luther also.

Read More

As a spoken language, however, German exists in many dialects, most of which belong to either the High German or Low German dialectal groups. The main difference between High and Low German is in the sound system, especially in the consonants. High German, the language of the southern highlands of Germany, is the official written language.

Read More

Low German definition: 1. Plattdeutsch 2. the West Germanic languages, except for High German, of the Germanic branch of Indo-European, represented by Old Low Franconian, Old Saxon, Old Frisian, and Old English, and their later stages, including Dutch, P.

Read More

German language - Dialect continuum - High German consonant shift - Dialect - Mutual intelligibility - Standard German - Ripuarian language - Silesian German - Wymysorys language - High Prussian dialect - Rio Grande do Sul - Alemannic German - History of German - Benrath line - Dutch language - Frisian languages - Central German - Low German - Early modern period - Linguistics - Variety.

Read More

High German differs from Low German and from all the other Germanic dialects chiefly by the so-called High German shifting of consonants, which probably took place between A.d. 500 and 700.

Read More

The Germanic languages include some 58 (SIL estimate) languages and dialects that originated in Europe; this language family is a part of the Indo-European language family.Each subfamily in this list contains subgroups and individual languages. The standard division of Germanic is into three branches, East Germanic languages.

Read More

High German differs from other West German languages such as Low German, English, and Dutch in that High German when through the High German Consonant Shift. The High German Consonant Shift (or HGCS) is the sound shift where; Non-geminated voicless stops became fricatives, Geminated, nasal-adjacent and liquid-adjacent voiceless stops became.

Read More

The High and Low of German Dialects; Wikipedia: High German and Low German; Windows ALT Codes. In Windows, combinations of the ALT key plus a numeric code from the number keypad can be used to type a non-English character in any Windows application. See the detailed instructions on the ALT Code How To for complete information on implementing the code. Additional options for entering accents in.

Read More